Employer Identification Number (Federal Tax ID )

Apply online and get an EIN for your business.

After your business is formed, you'll need to apply for Employer Identification Number (EIN). An EIN is a nine-digit number that is issued by the IRS and used to uniquely identify employer tax accounts. Think of it as how a Social Security Number (SSN) identifies an individual, only an EIN is less sensitive. Our filing experts make filing your EIN application quick and easy.

What are the benefits of filing an EIN?

Open a bank account

Most banks require that you have an EIN before you can open a bank account under your business name.

Hire Employees

The IRS requires that every business must have an Employer Identification Number before hiring employees.

Establish a credit profile

Filing an EIN allows your business to build its credit profile, separate from the credit profiles of its members or owners.

We handle the paperwork

We make it easy by filing with the IRs on your behalf, and provide you with your employer identification number once complete.

What is an Employer Identification Number?

An Employer Identification Number (EIN) is a unique number assigned to your business by the Internal Revenue Service that is used to identify a business entity, allowing you to file business income tax returns. Some other common names for an EIN are a "FEIN," "E.I.N. Number," or a "Federal Tax ID", which all refer to the same number. Much like an Social Security Number would identify an individual or sole proprietor (taxpayer identification number), an EIN will be used by the IRS to identify a business entity for taxation. Unlike SSNs, They are considered to be less sensitive, so they are often used by entrepreneurs as their identification on government forms and official documents since there is much less risk of identity theft.

Who needs an EIN?

While there are many benefits for almost any small business to apply for an EIN, there are some cases in which a business will be required to have one. If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you are required to have an EIN.

  • Have you hired, or plan to hire, employees?
  • Is your business incorporated as an LLC, partnership or corporation?
  • Do you plan on opening a business bank account and establishing business credit?
  • Do you file employment, excise, alcohol, tobacco or firearm taxes?
  • Do you withhold taxes on income to a non-resident alien?
  • Do you plan on changing your organization type?

What if I don't hire employees? Do I still need an EIN?

Once you have incorporated your business, it becomes its own legal entity with you as its employee. You may still use your SSN to identify your business, but you must also have an EIN so the IRS can track the business, ensure it collects payroll tax, and stay in compliance. If you plan to run your business as a partnership, you will also be required to have an EIN because the social security numbers of both partners cannot be used as identifiers. If you are unsure, you can get more information about the requirements on the IRS website.

Does a single member LLC benefit from an EIN?

A single member LLC can also file for an EIN for their business, although generally it is not required. A single member LLC is considered a disregarded entity by the IRS and is treated as a sole proprietorship, so all income is passed to the owners. However, you can use either your SSN or EIN when receiving 1099-MISC income. Just make sure to report all these 1099-MISCs under your Schedule C since they all relate to your LLC business income.. This can provide added protection for your SSN, especially in cases where you may be providing W-9s to multiple businesses. If your LLC purchases property, or pays excise taxes, you may also use your EIN.

When should I file an EIN?

The best time to file an EIN for your business is after it has been legally formed. When you apply for an EIN, the IRS assumes that your business is already in existence.

"Our goal has always been to make starting and maintaining a business easier for our customers."

Deborah Sweeney - MyCorporation CEO

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Frequently asked questions

An EIN is a federal tax id number issued by the IRS to identify a business entity (similar to a social security number being issued to identify an individual, except that an employer identification number is used to identify a business entity instead of a person).

An EIN is usually necessary when an applicant:

  • Starts a New Business
  • Hires (or Will Hire) Employees
  • Is an LLC or Corporation
  • Opens a Bank Account
  • Changes Type of Organization
  • Purchases an Ongoing Business
  • Creates a Trust or Pension Plan
  • Is a Withholding Agent for Taxes

If the answer to any of the following questions is "YES" then you should obtain an EIN:

  • Do you have employees?
  • Do you operate your business as a corporation or a partnership?
  • Do you file any of these tax returns: Employment; Excise; or Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms?
  • Do you withhold taxes on income, other than wages, paid to a non-resident alien?
  • Do you have a Keogh plan?
  • Are you involved with any of the following types of organizations?
    • Trusts
    • Estates
    • Real estate mortgage investment conduits
    • Non-profit organizations
    • Farmers' cooperatives
    • Plan administrators

Legally, you are required to identify your business with one of two numbers: either your Social Security Number or an EIN (Employer Identification Number, a.k.a. Federal Tax ID Number). If you are a sole proprietor, your Social Security Number can be used on all of your government forms and other official documents, but most small business advisors recommend that you apply for an employer identification number and use the EIN number instead. If you are a corporation, LLC, or other state-level entity, you must obtain an EIN because your business is an entirely separate legal entity. Furthermore, banks require an EIN in order to open a business bank account.